Irony - Examples and Definition of Irony in Literature

 

situational irony examples in literature

Aug 07,  · Situational Irony. Situational irony is often the easiest to identify. Simply put, situational irony occurs when there is an incongruity between what is expected to happen and what actually. Situational Irony Examples. Irony is when something is said that is the opposite of what is meant or when something occurs that is the opposite of what is expected. There are three types of irony: verbal, situational, and dramatic. Situational Irony occurs when actions or events have the opposite result from what is expected or what is intended. What is Situational Irony? Situational irony occurs when the unexpected happens in the plot. Authors often set up stories in a way where the reader has an expectation of what’s going to happen; however, when a twist occurs and the reality differs from the expectation, this is known as situational irony. Here are some examples of situational.


Examples of Situational Irony


Situational irony is a literary device that you can easily identify in literary works. Simply, it occurs when incongruity appears between expectations of something to happen, and what actually happens instead.

Thus, something entirely different happens from what audience may be expecting, or the final outcome is opposite to what the audience is expecting. Situational irony generally includes sharp contrasts and contradictions. The purpose of ironic situations is to allow the readers to make a distinction between appearances and realities, and eventually associate them to the theme of a story.

The Harry Potter series is one of the most popular novel series having employed situational irony. Through seven novels, the audience believes that Harry can kill Voldemort, the evil lord, situational irony examples in literature. Situational irony examples in literature using situational irony, situational irony examples in literature, Rowling has done a great job of adding a twist to the story to further a complex conflict. A very famous example of this form of irony occurs toward the end of the short storyThe story of an Hourby Kate Chopin.

In this story, the wife of Mr. Brently comes to know that he is no more alive and has died from an accident, so she feels contended to live a long life of freedom with no restrictions. However, at the end of the tale, her husband comes back unexpectedly and, upon seeing him, instantly she dies from shock. The whole story of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz presents a case of situational irony. Dorothy goes to the wizard in order to find a way home, only to learn that she is capable of doing so herself.

Scarecrow wished to become intelligent, but he discovers himself a perfect genius. Woodsman considers himself as not capable of love; nevertheless he learns that he has a good heart. Lion appears as a coward, and turns out to be extremely fearless and courageous.

Romeo strives to bring out peace between Tybalt and Mercutio, and eventually between the Capulets and the Montagues. For keeping up appearances, situational irony examples in literature, the leading characterMathilda, borrows a necklace from a wealthy friend but loses it.

Years later, Mathilda meets this friend again, and learns that the jewelry she replaced with real and costly gemstones was merely a costume and artificial piece of jewelry. The function of situational irony is to lay emphasis on important scenes and make strange and unusual images vivid.

It creates an unexpected turn at the end of a story, and makes audience laugh or cry. Therefore, situational irony could be tragic or funny. Usually writers employ strong word connections with situational irony and add fresh thoughts, variations, and embellishments to their works.

It may range from the most comic to the most tragic situations. Its comical use usually creates an unexpected turnaround in a plot for the betterment. Sometimes, these forms of irony occur because people identify certain events and situations as unfair or odd.

Definition of Situational Situational irony examples in literature Situational irony is a literary device that you can easily identify in literary works.

 

3 Types of Irony in Literature | Irony Definition & Examples

 

situational irony examples in literature

 

Situational irony refers to a situation where the outcome and the expectations or intentions are not what is expected. In other words, the actions or intentions are not in line with the outcome. One illustrative example of situational irony would be if a fire station were to burn down. Examples of Situational Irony in Literature. Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare - "O my love, my wife! Death, that hath sucked the honey of thy breath, Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty.". Situational Irony Examples. Irony is when something is said that is the opposite of what is meant or when something occurs that is the opposite of what is expected. There are three types of irony: verbal, situational, and dramatic. Situational Irony occurs when actions or events have the opposite result from what is expected or what is intended.